Occupational Therapy Assisting

Occupational Therapy Assisting (OTA) Courses

OTA 100 Introduction to Occupational Therapy

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course has been designed to provide the student with information needed to determine if occupational therapy (OT) is a suitable career option. The student is introduced to human occupation as participation in everyday life activities. In addition, the course will address how health, wellness, disease, and disability affect engagement in life tasks and how OT interventions are used to maximize performance within chosen activities. The role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) is defined, with explanation of the history of OT as well as current and emerging practice settings. Professional activities, requirements, ethics, and behaviors are also discussed. A four-hour observation in an OT clinic or program for special needs populations is required. Students are responsible for securing their own observation sites, with guidance from the instructor, as well as the related transportation to/from the facility. Some facilities may have additional requirements for student observations, such as a clear tuberculosis test and/or fingerprinting. Students are responsible for the cost of these additional requirements, if any.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify elements of the OT Practice Framework including features of the areas of occupation, performance skills and patterns, activity demands, contexts and environments, client factors, and the interaction of occupation and activity.
  • distinguish between occupation and activity, the unique nature of occupation, and how these interact in human performance.
  • describe the historical foundations and philosophical base of OT, and current sociopolitical that impact current and emerging practice areas.
  • describe the role of occupation in the promotion of health and in prevention of disease, illness, and dysfunction.
  • explain the purpose and process of activity analysis as related to safety and functional performance.
  • define grading, adapting, and modifying tasks and environments to maximize occupational performance.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • describe how policy and political factors affect the practice of OT.
  • describe advocacy as related to effect change in policies, practice, and the role of the OTA.
  • list ways in which federal/state legislation and regulations can influence the practice of OT.
  • identify the responsible administrative bodies and process for securing certification and licensure as an OTA.
  • describe legal and ethical factors in supervision of the OTA and OT aides.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • explain and give examples of how the role of the OT practitioner is enhanced by involvement in professional organizations.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.

OTA 110 Functional Biomechanics for the OTA

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:OTA 150 and 152 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 111
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) student will explore components of human movement, including joint structure and function, muscle action, motor and reflex development, and balance and sensory influence. In addition to the body structures involved in movement, students will examine the motor and process skills and sensory and neuromusculoskeletal client factors required for engagement in occupation across the lifespan. Students will complete a formal biomechanical activity analysis as it relates to occupational performance.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate knowledge of the structure and function of the human body to include biological factors, kinesiology, and biomechanics.
  • apply theory and evidence to OT intervention planning for orthopedic and neurological populations in a variety of contexts and settings.
  • identify the effects of disease processes and their impact on biomechanical occupational performance.
  • apply principles of activity analysis in order to grade, adapt, and modify activity demands and environments to optimize intervention plans and maximize occupational performance.
  • discuss client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • explain the need for orthotics to enhance occupational performance.
  • identify methods to enhance functional and community mobility for those with biomechanical performance deficits.
  • define superficial and deep thermal agents, electrotherapeutic agents, and mechanical devices as a preparatory intervention method.
  • define principles of ergonomics based on client needs and contexts, and with consideration for technological advances.

OTA 111 Functional Biomechanics Lab for the OTA

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:OTA 150 and 152 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) student will use an analysis and problem-solving approach to functional human movement across the lifespan. Through hands-on laboratory activities, students will develop skills in assessment of client factors affecting engagement in occupations. Students will explore basic intervention methods and strategies for remediation of and compensation for biomechanical deficits and impairments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • explain strategies for use of assistive technologies to enhance occupational performance.
  • provide training in basic functional mobility, including transfers, wheelchair management, and mobility devices.
  • demonstrate principles of teaching and learning as a part of OT process, using educational and health literacy approaches.
  • demonstrate effective and role-appropriate OT/OTA collaboration in the screening and evaluation process.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.

OTA 120 Fundamentals of Occupational Therapy Assistant Practice

  • Units:2.5
  • Hours:45 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:OTA 123 and LIBR 307 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course the student will develop knowledge and understanding of the various contexts in which Occupational Therapy (OT) services are provided. Participation in the management and reimbursement of OT services within the scope of the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) is addressed as well. Included is discussion of the principles of management and systems as they relate to providing OT services to individuals and within organizations. Professional responsibilities are examined with an emphasis on development of professional attitudes and behaviors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the process of OT theory development and its importance to occupational therapy.
  • explain the importance of using psychometrically sound assessment tools when considering client needs, and cultural and contextual factors to deliver evidence-based intervention plans and strategies.
  • describe the inter- and intraprofessional consultative process.
  • demonstrate knowledge of technology in OT practice, to include electronic documentation systems and telehealth methods.
  • identify legislation and regulations for treatment of dysphagia and feeding disorders within California and in the role of the OTA.
  • identify legislation and regulations for the use of superficial and deep thermal agents, electrotherapeutic agents, and mechanical devices as a preparatory methods within California and in the role of the OTA.
  • describe care coordination, case management, and transition services in traditional practice environments.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • describe the process of collaboration with the OT when referral to other professions and/or community agencies is indicated.
  • describe the process of collaboration with the OT when there is a need to design primary care-based programming to support occupational performance.
  • describe various reimbursement and coding systems, and documentation requirements that include justification for OT services.
  • identify and explain contextual, current policy issues, socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors affecting the practice of OT.
  • explain the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effecting systems changes, recognizing opportunities in emerging practice, and expanding the role of the OTA.
  • explain basic business practices, including financial management, billing, and coding.
  • describe ways in which federal/state legislation and regulations and their implications affect current practice in OT.
  • demonstrate knowledge of state and national administrative bodies legislating and regulating licensure and credentialing for OT practitioners.
  • identify the need for and demonstrate the ability to participate in development, marketing, and management of service delivery options as related to current practice areas in OT.
  • describe and participate in processes for quality management and improvement, implementing program changes as needed.
  • define strategies for legal and ethical factors in supervision of the OTA and OT aides.
  • understand principles of teaching and learning in the role of the OTA, as applied to patient education and academic settings.
  • explain how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession.
  • understand the difference between quantitative and qualitative research studies.
  • demonstrate knowledge of liability issues in current models of service provision and the role of the OTA providing services on a contractual basis.
  • define how the role of the professional is enhanced by participating in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations.

OTA 121 Contemporary Models of Practice in Occupational Therapy

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:OTA 120 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Significant changes in health care have resulted in a move away from the medical and institutional models to community-based models. This course will provide the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) student with a foundation of knowledge that will allow the student to pursue practice opportunities in community-based and other non-traditional and emerging practice settings. In this course, the student will gain an understanding of the various disciplines involved in these settings, the role of or potential for occupational therapy (OT) services within these organizations and funding sources. The student will explore legislative aspects of OT in community-based and non-traditional services, further developing their professional advocacy skills. Students will also explore the profession's philosophical beliefs about inclusion and OT service accessibility.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply knowledge of how OT history, philosophical base, theory, and sociopolitical climate influence society’s occupational needs and OT practice.
  • apply evidence-based aspects of the benefits of balancing areas of occupation and the role of occupation in health promotion and illness prevention in community-based and non-traditional practice areas.
  • engage the inter- and intraprofessional consultative process.
  • describe care coordination, case management, and transition services in emerging practice environments.
  • describe the process of collaboration with the OT when referral to other professions and/or community agencies is indicated.
  • describe the process of collaboration with the OT when there is a need to design community-based programming to support occupational performance.
  • identify and explain contextual, current policy issues, socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors affecting the practice of OT.
  • explain the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effecting systems changes, recognizing opportunities in emerging practice, and expanding the role of the OTA.
  • describe ways in which federal/state legislation and regulations and their implications affect emerging and/or underserved practice areas in OT.
  • identify the need for and demonstrate the ability to participate in development, marketing, and management of service delivery options as related to emerging and/or underserved practice areas in OT.
  • describe and participate in processes for quality management and improvement, implementing program changes as needed.
  • demonstrate knowledge of liability issues in emerging models of service provision and the role of the OTA providing services on a contractual basis.
  • promote OT by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.

OTA 122 Introduction to Clinical Practice in Non-Traditional Settings

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:AH 106 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through Level I fieldwork experiences, students will be introduced to non-traditional practice for individuals with conditions that limit or affect engagement in occupations. As participant observers, students will integrate academic experiences with Occupational Therapy (OT) process in fieldwork settings serving non-traditional clients, those not in typical clinical settings. Through interactions with clients and staff, students will develop skills in observation of occupational performance, clinical safety, therapeutic communication and clinical relationships, professional behavior and boundary-setting, and the self-awareness necessary to be a successful OT practitioner. Students will be required to complete 40 hours of clinical fieldwork during weekday business hours and attend 14 hours of on-campus discussion group. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • promote OT and define the distinct nature of occupation through outreach activities by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • document client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.

OTA 123 Fundamentals of Clinical Documentation

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:See enrollment limitations
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of core OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, the Occupational Therapy Assistant student will develop basic skills in clinical documentation. Students will be introduced to various documentation formats as required by different treatment settings and reimbursement systems. Students will be required to distinguish between subjective and objective reports and development of the clinical opinion and a plan based on these reports. The "Occupational Therapy Practice Framework" will be used as a tool critical to developing fluency in documentation terminology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define elements of the OT Practice Framework including features of the areas of occupation, performance skills and patterns, activity demands, contexts and environments, client factors, and the interaction of occupation and activity.
  • report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • demonstrate knowledge of technology in OT practice, to include electronic documentation systems.
  • identify common reimbursement and coding systems, and documentation requirements that include justification for OT services.
  • apply common medical terminology and abbreviations as components of effective clinical documentation.
  • identify methods for documenting perspectives of the patient and caregiver, clinical data gathered as part of the OT process, clinical opinions, and intervention plans.
  • create sample documentation notes, applying different formats used in practice.
  • list legal factors in clinical documentation.

OTA 124 Introduction to Electronic Documentation for the OTA

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:OTA 120 and 123 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The use of electronic medical record (EMR) is an expected skill in health care practice as service providers establish compliance with federal mandates for medical information management. This course will provide the occupational therapy assistant student with an introduction to EMR formats, methods, reimbursement requirements, and legal issues. This course prepares the student for learning the basics of the EMR in preparation for Level II fieldwork.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • demonstrate knowledge of technology in OT practice, to include electronic documentation systems.
  • identify and describe factors related to common reimbursement and coding systems, and explain documentation requirements that include justification for OT services.
  • demonstrate basic skills in accessing various features of electronic documentation as related to occupational therapy service provision by the occupational therapy assistant.
  • demonstrate how to enter specific data into the electronic medical record, including minutes and type(s) of service provided and billing codes.
  • demonstrate how to enter relevant narrative information into the electronic medical record, including patient feedback and clinical assessment.

OTA 131 Occupational Therapy Theory and Process in Psychosocial Dysfunction

  • Units:5
  • Hours:72 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:See enrollment limitations
  • Corequisite:OTA 132
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) when working with individuals who have mental health conditions, cognitive impairments, trauma histories, and/or disregulated behaviors in a range of settings and contexts. Students will explore areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, contexts, activity demands, and client factors that affect engagement in occupation throughout the lifespan and how these are influenced by psychosocial factors. Occupational Therapy (OT) process will be addressed to include an understanding of an occupational profile, analysis of occupational performance, intervention planning and implementation, and methods to elicit therapeutic outcomes. Students will also advance their skills in activity analysis and the use of professional literature and resources, as well as their awareness of the theoretical models that influence clinical decision-making.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of concepts of human development, psychology, and behavior in adult populations, inclusive of factors in behavioral, social, and occupational science.
  • explain how sociocultural, socioeconomic, diversity, and lifestyle factors affect the needs of individuals and groups.
  • define social determinants of health, identifying risk, epidemiological, and public health factors for cognitive-behavioral populations.
  • apply theory and evidence to OT intervention planning for cognitive-behavioral populations in a variety of contexts and settings.
  • define the process of theory development and its importance to occupational therapy.
  • apply knowledge of how OT history, philosophical base, theory, and sociopolitical climate influence society’s occupational needs and OT practice.
  • incorporate elements of the OT Practice Framework and the interaction of occupation and activity into clinical reasoning for cognitive-behavioral populations.
  • identify evidence-based aspects of the benefits of balancing areas of occupation and the role of occupation in health promotion and illness prevention.
  • identify the effects of disease processes and their impact on occupational performance in cognitive-behavioral populations.
  • apply principles of activity analysis in order to grade, adapt, and modify activity demands and environments to optimize intervention plans and maximize occupational performance.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • select intervention strategies that remediate and/or compensate for functional cognitive, visual, and psychosocial/behavioral deficits that affect occupational performance.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • demonstrate principles of teaching and learning as a part of OT process, using educational and health literacy approaches.
  • monitor and communicate aspects of intervention outcomes and the justification to continue or modify treatment, in collaboration with the OT.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • demonstrate effective and role-appropriate OT/OTA collaboration in the screening and evaluation process.
  • describe the role of the OTA in implementing discharge plan designed by the OT and the interprofessional team that includes resources and considers the discharge environment.
  • understand principles of teaching and learning in the role of the OTA, as applied to patient education and academic settings.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.

OTA 132 Introduction to Clinical Practice in Psychosocial Dysfunction

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:See enrollment limitations
  • Corequisite:OTA 131
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through Level I fieldwork experiences, students will be introduced to clinical practice for individuals with mental health conditions and disregulated behaviors that limit or affect engagement in occupations. As participant observers, students will integrate academic experiences with Occupational Therapy (OT) process in settings serving clients with a variety of psychosocial challenges and degrees of disability. Through interactions with clients and staff, students will develop skills in observation of occupational performance, clinical safety, therapeutic communication and clinical relationships, professional behavior and boundary-setting, and the self-awareness necessary to be a successful OT practitioner. Students will be required to complete 40 hours of clinical fieldwork during weekday business hours and attend 14 hours of on-campus discussion group. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • promote OT and define the distinct nature of occupation through outreach activities by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • document client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.

OTA 140 Theoretical Foundations of Physical Dysfunction

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:OTA 110 and 111 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 141 and 142
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) student to neurological, orthopedic, and medical conditions that result in physical disabilities. Students will explore areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, contexts, activity demands, and client factors that affect engagement in occupation throughout the lifespan and how these are influenced by physical dysfunction. Students will also develop skills in the use of professional literature and resources, as well as an awareness of the theoretical models that influence clinical decision-making.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate knowledge of the structure and function of the human body to include biological factors, neuroscience, kinesiology, and biomechanics.
  • define social determinants of health, identifying risk, epidemiological, and public health factors for physical disability populations.
  • apply theory and evidence to OT intervention planning for physical disability populations in a variety of contexts and settings.
  • identify the effects of disease processes and their impact on occupational performance in physical disabilities populations.
  • apply principles of activity analysis in order to grade, adapt, and modify activity demands and environments to optimize intervention plans and maximize occupational performance.
  • describe indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of superficial and deep thermal agents, electrotherapeutic agents, and mechanical devices as a preparatory intervention method.
  • locate and demonstrate understanding of professional literature, including the quality of information sources, in order to contribute to evidence-based practice decisions.
  • explain how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession.
  • demonstrate the skills to understand a scholarly report.

OTA 141 Occupational Therapy Process in Physical Dysfunction

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:OTA 110 and 111 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 140 and 142
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) when working with individuals who have orthopedic, neurological, or medical conditions. Occupational Therapy (OT) process will be addressed, to include an understanding of an occupational profile, analysis of occupational performance, as well as intervention planning, implementation, and approaches. Students will also develop skills in selected assessments, clinical documentation, and the selection and use of therapeutic activities and media to elicit engagement in occupation and therapeutic outcomes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • incorporate elements of the OT Practice Framework and the interaction of occupation and activity into clinical reasoning for physical disabilities populations.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • select intervention strategies that remediate and/or compensate for functional visual deficits that affect occupational performance.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • explain and demonstrate strategies for use of assistive technologies to enhance occupational performance.
  • explain the need for, and design, fabricate, apply, fit, and train others in orthotics to enhance occupational performance.
  • provide training in basic and advanced functional mobility, including transfers, wheelchair management, and mobility devices.
  • provide training to enhance community mobility, including driver rehabilitation and community access.
  • demonstrate knowledge of technology in OT practice, to include virtual environments.
  • demonstrate interventions for dysphagia and feeding disorders, including precautions and techniques, for adult populations.
  • apply principles of ergonomics based on client needs and contexts, and with consideration for technological advances.
  • demonstrate principles of teaching and learning as a part of OT process, using educational and health literacy approaches.
  • monitor and communicate aspects of intervention outcomes and the justification to continue or modify treatment, in collaboration with the OT.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • demonstrate effective and role-appropriate OT/OTA collaboration in the screening and evaluation process.
  • describe the role of the OTA in implementing discharge plan designed by the OT and the interprofessional team that includes resources and considers the discharge environment.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.

OTA 142 Introduction to Clinical Practice in Physical Dysfunction

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:OTA 110 and 111 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 141
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through Level I fieldwork experiences, students will be introduced to clinical practice for individuals with physical disabilities that limit or affect engagement in occupation. As participant observers, students will integrate academic experiences with Occupational Therapy (OT) process in settings serving clients with a variety of physical challenges and degrees of disability. Through interactions with clients and staff, students will develop skills in observation of occupational performance, clinical safety, therapeutic communication and clinical relationships, professional behavior and boundary-setting, and the self-awareness necessary to be a successful OT practitioner. Students will be required to complete 40 hours of clinical fieldwork during weekday business hours and attend 14 hours of on-campus discussion group. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • promote OT and define the distinct nature of occupation through outreach activities by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • document client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.

OTA 150 Occupational Therapy Process and Practice in Developmental Disabilities and Pediatric Conditions

  • Units:2.5
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:See enrollment limitations
  • Corequisite:OTA 152
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces developmental disabilities and common conditions of children and adolescents referred for occupational therapy treatment. The scope of occupational therapy, the types of practice settings, and the role of the occupational therapy assistant in pediatrics and developmental disabilities are also covered. Common frames of references, evaluation tools and procedures, and intervention strategies used in pediatric occupational therapy practice are presented.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of concepts of human development, psychology, and behavior in pediatric and adolescent populations, inclusive of factors in behavioral, social, and occupational science.
  • define social determinants of health, identifying risk, epidemiological, and public health factors for pediatric and adolescent populations.
  • apply theory and evidence to OT intervention planning for pediatric and adolescent populations in a variety of contexts and settings.
  • incorporate elements of the OT Practice Framework and the interaction of occupation and activity into clinical reasoning for pediatric and adolescent populations.
  • identify the effects of disease processes and their impact on occupational performance in pediatric and adolescent populations.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • select intervention strategies that remediate and/or compensate for functional cognitive, visual, and psychosocial or behavioral deficits that affect occupational performance.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • explain and demonstrate strategies for use of assistive technologies to enhance occupational performance.
  • explain the need for orthotics in pediatric populations to enhance occupational performance.
  • explain variables of dysphagia and feeding disorders, including precautions and techniques, for pediatric populations.
  • demonstrate effective and role-appropriate OT/OTA collaboration in the screening and evaluation process.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.

OTA 152 Introduction to Clinical Practice in Pediatric Conditions

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:See enrollment limitations
  • Corequisite:OTA 150
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must have completed all degree and college graduation requirements with the exception of OTA courses and be officially accepted into an OTA program cohort.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through Level I fieldwork experiences, students will be introduced to clinical practice for individuals with pediatric or developmental conditions that limit or affect engagement in occupation. As participant observers, students will integrate academic experiences with Occupational Therapy (OT) process in settings serving clients with a variety of occupational challenges and degrees of disability. Through interactions with clients and staff, students will develop skills in observation of occupational performance, clinical safety, therapeutic communication and clinical relationships, professional behavior and boundary-setting, and the self-awareness necessary to be a successful OT practitioner. Students will be required to complete 20 hours of clinical fieldwork and attend 7 hours of on-campus discussion group. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • promote OT and define the distinct nature of occupation through outreach activities by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.
  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • document client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • describe various roles, dynamics, and desired attributes within the interprofessional team.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.

OTA 160 Fieldwork Level II for the Occupational Therapy Assistant

  • Units:6
  • Hours:324 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:OTA 131 and 132 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 162
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course concentrates on the application of knowledge and skills for the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) student. The student is placed in a supervised fieldwork setting, which provides the student with the opportunity for carrying out professional responsibility with appropriate supervision and professional role modeling. Students complete 320 hours of supervised fieldwork in a facility working with patients with physical and/or psychosocial dysfunction. Students will be placed in two distinctly different clinical settings for OTA 160 and OTA 161 in order to experience a broad range of clinical expectations and scenarios, while progressively refining and advancing skills from one course to the next. Fieldwork sites are assigned by the fieldwork coordinator. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • implement a discharge plan designed by the OT and the interprofessional team that includes resources and considers the discharge environment.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.
  • demonstrate the ability to accept professional feedback and modify behavior and actions based on feedback.

OTA 161 Fieldwork Level II for the Occupational Therapy Assistant

  • Units:6
  • Hours:324 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:OTA 121, 141, and 142 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:OTA 163
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course concentrates on the application of knowledge and skills for the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) student. The student is placed in a supervised fieldwork setting, which provides the student with the opportunity for carrying out professional responsibility with appropriate supervision and professional role modeling. Students complete 320 hours of supervised fieldwork in a facility working with patients with physical and/or psychosocial dysfunction. Students will be placed in two distinctly different clinical settings for OTA 160 and OTA 161 in order to experience a broad range of clinical expectations and scenarios, while progressively refining and advancing skills from one course to the next. Fieldwork sites are assigned by the fieldwork coordinator. This course is graded Pass/No Pass. Note: Fieldwork sites may require current documentation for the following requirements: a physical examination, immunizations, a TB test, CPR certification for health personnel (level C), background check, fingerprinting, drug screen, proof of health insurance, and proof of automobile insurance if driving is involved as part of the clinical experience. Students are responsible for their own transportation to/from the fieldwork site.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • demonstrate consistent application of therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning as part of the therapeutic process.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • facilitate client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, their families and significant others, and the interprofessional team in a responsive and responsible manner.
  • implement a discharge plan designed by the OT and the interprofessional team that includes resources and considers the discharge environment.
  • demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of essential core documents from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and how these guide ethical practice and decision-making in OT practice.
  • demonstrate written and verbal reporting skills.
  • demonstrate work behaviors that reflect the professional nature of OT practice.
  • demonstrate the ability to accept professional feedback and modify behavior and actions based on feedback.

OTA 162 Practice Skills for First Rotation OTA Level II Fieldwork

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:OTA 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course, taken in conjunction with OTA 160, provides the OTA student with structured lab activities to support success in clinical activities during Level II fieldwork. Students will practice the occupational therapy assessment and treatment needs of various populations through the lifespan. To ensure currency in a range of topics, this lab will also include activities related to OTA scope of practice, documentation, regulations, productivity, and reimbursement. National certification exam and licensing preparation activities will also be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • identify client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • select intervention strategies that remediate and/or compensate for functional cognitive, visual, and psychosocial/behavioral deficits that affect occupational performance.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • describe care coordination, case management, and transition services in traditional practice environments.
  • describe variables that justify to continuation or modification of selected interventions, in collaboration with the OT.
  • state the requirements and procedures for securing certification and licensure as an OTA.
  • define strategies for legal and ethical factors in supervision of the OTA and OT aides.
  • understand principles of teaching and learning in the role of the OTA, as applied to patient education and academic settings.
  • define how the role of the professional is enhanced by participating in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations.
  • identify and develop strategies for ongoing professional development to maintain current knowledge of OT practice and comply with licensing requirements.

OTA 163 Practice Skills for Second Rotation OTA Level II Fieldwork

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:OTA 161
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course, taken in conjunction with OTA 161, provides the OTA student with structured lab activities to support success in clinical activities during Level II fieldwork. Students will practice the occupational therapy assessment and treatment needs of various populations through the lifespan. To ensure currency in a range of topics, this lab will also include activities related to OTA scope of practice, documentation, regulations, productivity, and reimbursement. National certification exam and licensing preparation activities will also be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, adhering to safety regulations, in all academic and practice settings.
  • identify client-centered and culturally relevant occupation-based interventions that enhance occupational performance and also address promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention when indicated, based on current evidence.
  • demonstrate skills in contributing to the evaluation process by completion of the occupational profile, as well as standardized and non-standardized assessments for collaboration in the intervention planning process.
  • collect, organize, and report evaluation and outcome data under the supervision of an occupational therapist.
  • select intervention strategies that remediate and/or compensate for functional cognitive, visual, and psychosocial/behavioral deficits that affect occupational performance.
  • provide interventions to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in occupations, including occupation-based tasks, preparatory methods and tasks, education, and advocacy.
  • describe care coordination, case management, and transition services in traditional practice environments.
  • describe variables that justify to continuation or modification of selected interventions, in collaboration with the OT.
  • state the requirements and procedures for securing certification and licensure as an OTA.
  • define strategies for legal and ethical factors in supervision of the OTA and OT aides.
  • understand principles of teaching and learning in the role of the OTA, as applied to patient education and academic settings.
  • define how the role of the professional is enhanced by participating in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations.
  • identify and develop strategies for ongoing professional development to maintain current knowledge of OT practice and comply with licensing requirements.

OTA 295 Independent Studies in Occupational Therapy Assistant

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Only students officially enrolled in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program, and in good-standing, are eligible for this course.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course allows an individual student enrolled in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program to study, research, and participate in clinical or community activities beyond the scope of regularly offered classes, pursuant to an agreement among the college, faculty members, and the student.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce work independently on occupational therapy related topics.

OTA 299 Experimental Offering in Occupational Therapy Assistant

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


More About the Program

OTA Program Details

OTA Application Deadline Extended

Submissions will be accepted up to 11:59 p.m. on September 27, 2020.

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Accredited By

Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)

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6116 Executive Blvd.
North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929
(301) 652-AOTA

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Health and Health Professions

Health and Health Professions meta major

This program is part of the Health and Health Professions meta major.

Health and Health Professions