Sociology

Sociology (SOC) Courses

SOC 99 Workplace Success: A Sociological Map to Succeeding in the Workplace

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course teaches students how to use the sociological perspective to reconceptualize the workplace and develop the interpersonal and organizational skills it requires. It is a non-transferable and non-degree applicable course designed for students in need of strategies to help them attain success in the workplace.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use the sociological perspective to understand and respond to issues that arise in the workplace.
  • apply basic sociological concepts to everyday life.
  • demonstrate an understanding of and effectively respond to the social forces that impact individual lives.

SOC 300 Introductory Sociology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the elements and experience of social life. Analysis and discussion of social structure, culture, deviant behavior, social institutions, stratification, inequality, and social change will be explored within a domestic and global framework.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of social institutions and everyday life.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological theories and social research methods.
  • examine and develop an understanding of the social construction of reality and social categories.
  • evaluate the processes of social inequality, stratification and agency through a social justice lens.

SOC 301 Social Problems

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 115
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines contemporary social problems at the global, national, regional, and local level from a sociological perspective. Students will explore the social causes and consequences of problems and interventions, analyze the role of power and ideology, and evaluate proposed solutions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of social problems.
  • apply sociological theories and social research methods (including comparative/historical) to assess and analyze domestic and global problems as social processes.
  • assess how public policies and unequal social conditions affect individual and community experiences as well as how individual and community actions contribute to the continuation and/or change of those policies and conditions.

SOC 302 Introduction to Social Research Methods

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 (College Composition) or ESLW 340, and STAT 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines theoretical and ethical principles in social science research with an applied emphasis on research design, utilization of qualitative and quantitative techniques, data coding, data cleaning and organization, descriptive and inferential analysis, and the writing of research reports. Students will be introduced to the application of statistical software for quantitative areas of course work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of social science inquiry through a sociological lens.
  • define the parameters of qualitative and quantitative research projects.
  • develop a literature review for a research project.
  • identify ethical issues in research.

SOC 305 Critical Thinking in the Social Sciences

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or the equivalent
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the definitional and contextual nature of social issues. It develops a "critical thinking" approach, which integrates interdisciplinary principles and incorporates a comparative foundation utilizing literary criticism, logic, argumentation, and persuasion to analyze and compare the framing and validity of social problems. This course specifically explores how the media and scientific community collect, interpret, and report social data. Combining critical thinking tools with the sociological perspective will help students to question the assumptions that surround social phenomena and influence human behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between subjective, objective, and fallacious interpretations of information and consider how information is socially constructed.
  • research a diverse array of social issues and analyze their individual theses, findings, and conclusions to consider possible approaches to social change.
  • understand the principles of social science research methods and apply research skills in the collection, analysis, and reporting of social data.
  • demonstrate strength in writing, reading, and analytical skills within the social sciences.

SOC 310 Marriage and the Family

  • Same As:FCS 320
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D7; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the social, psychological, historical, and economic factors relating to changing family, courtship, marriage, and partnership patterns. This course will include examination and analysis of social constructions of childhood, adolescence, and early, middle, and late adulthood. Exploration of changing gender roles, courtship patterns, and parenting will also be included. Emphasis will be placed on diversity of families and family forms. (Credit may be awarded for either SOC 310 or FCS 320 but not both.)

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of sociology to the study of family.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological theories and social research methods (including comparative/historical) to the study of family.
  • examine socially constructed patterns of courtship, marriage, partnership, parenting and family practice as well as socially constructed stages of development (i.e. childhood, adolescence, and early/middle/late adulthood).
  • evaluate and assess the impact of stratification on families and relationships and our ability to shape them.

SOC 318 Introduction to Crime, Deviance, and Social Control

  • Same As:ADMJ 349
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Same as ADMJ 349)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces various sociological perspectives regarding issues of crime, deviance, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of how laws and cultural norms shape the definition and meaning of crime and deviance. Topics covered include street crimes, corporate crimes, white-collar crimes, domestic violence, drugs and alcohol abuse, lifestyle crimes, prison systems, capital punishment, rehabilitation, and the trend towards privatization of prisons. Field trips may be required. Credit may be earned for ADMJ 349 or SOC 318 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply core sociological perspectives to crime, deviance, and social control.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological and criminological theories of crime and deviance.
  • understand the social construction of crime, deviance, and social categories of offenses.
  • evaluate and assess how social stratification can impact experiences within the criminal justice system and our ability to shape them.

SOC 319 Sociology of Law and Justice

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces various perspectives on the formation and use of law as an organizing principle of society as well as how societal forces can, in turn, influence the law. Special attention will be focused on unequal access to, uses of, and outcomes from the law and its various agencies. Topics covered include the historical perspectives of law as an institution and its processes, the enabling and constraining role of law in social movements, punishment, environmental law, torts, constitutional law, and the Patriot Act.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the various sociological perspectives to the study of law and justice.
  • apply the comparative/historical approach to assess the role that societal influences can play in the implementation and punishment of legal codes.
  • critically analyze the disparate impact and experiences within the legal system of various demographic populations.
  • compare, contrast, and evaluate the American legal system with an international alternative.
  • explain how changing cultural norms, politics, and technological innovations can lead to changes in the law.

SOC 321 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines patterns of ethnic relations. The course emphasis is domestic but includes investigations of global concerns. Topics include discrimination, prejudice, social stratification, inequality, racism, sexism, ageism, homophobia, and related subjects.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply and critique sociological research and theories of racism, privilege, and intersectionality as a means of maintaining domination and oppression.
  • evaluate how social processes shaped the experiences of various underrepresented groups in the United States.
  • identify the historic and contemporary causes of prejudice and discrimination in the United States and assess the outcomes.
  • identify the social dynamics that lead to conflict, cooperation, and social change among groups in the US.

SOC 335 Sociology of Aging

  • Same As:GERON 300
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101 or ESLR 340 and ESLW 340 and ESL 114; and FCS 324; and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D0; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4J
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course students will examine the aging process with emphasis on social factors affecting and effected by an aging population. The course includes an analysis of demographics, history of aging in America, social conditions, resources and support systems, employment, retirement, social class, and cultural differences. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their status in the sociology of aging process. (Credit awarded for GERON 300 or SOC 335.)

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the field of social gerontology and population trends in the U.S. and worldwide.
  • identify historical and cross-cultural issues in aging.
  • identify cognitive changes that occur as one ages, including personality and mental health.
  • analyze the significance of love, intimacy, and sexuality in later life.
  • contrast social theories of aging including social supports and intergenerational relationships.
  • predict special needs in living arrangements as one ages.
  • assess the significance of paid and nonpaid roles in later life.
  • develop an awareness of social policies and issues that may have an impact on oneself (the student) as one grows through the process of aging.
  • identify special concerns of ethnic minorities and older women.
  • describe the process of dealing with death and bereavement- physically, cognitively, and emotionally.
  • cite biological theories regarding physiological changes with age.

SOC 341 Sex and Gender in the U.S.

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course focuses on gender relations in American society. It examines historical, social, economic, political, and cultural forces in shaping gender identity and gender roles. The goal of the course is to utilize sociological theories to explain gender experience as socially constructed rather than biologically determined. Specifically, the course examines the experience of people of diverse economic, racial, and ethnic origins within a historical and cross-cultural perspective.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of sociology to the study of sex and gender.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological (and social science) theories and social research methods (including comparative/historical) to the study of gender and sex.
  • examine the social and historical construction of sex and gender and its influence on individual and collective behavior.
  • evaluate the role of various institutions in creating and perpetuating social inequality and stratification of sex and gender inequality.

SOC 343 Women and Social Action

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides an overview of the ways in which women engage in deliberative social action to change the conditions of their lives and of their communities. The work of various social activists, past and present, will be analyzed in the context of sociological theory as applied to issues related to the institutions of family, health, religion, employment, sexual harassment, housing, and interpersonal violence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the ways in which social change may be formulated, strategized, and initiated.
  • describe how gender inequalities intersect with other systems of inequality, such as age, class, disability, ethnicity, race, religion, and sexual orientation.
  • compare the issues around which women from different social backgrounds organize and mobilize.
  • compare the strengths and challenges of a variety of leadership styles.
  • examine social issues and social change efforts using a feminist perspective.
  • evaluate the impact of structural and policy changes as they affect the lives of women and communities.

SOC 344 Sociology of Women's Health

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better. LIBR 318 with grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides a sociological analysis of health issues that concern women throughout their lives. The impact of physiology, psychology, culture, society, and politics upon women's well-being will be addressed using the feminist perspective.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate sociological and feminist perspectives and research methods in the study of women's health.
  • identify and analyze key issues affecting women’s health and reproductive health through transnational perspectives.
  • demonstrate knowledge about the strategies employed by women throughout the world to resist gender oppression and to organize and reshape their communities.

SOC 345 Global Women's Issues

  • Same As:WGS 302
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The course will consider the conditions of women’s lives from the perspectives of global and transnational feminism, examining issues such as immigration, girls’ education, maternal health, globalization, economics, war and conflict, gender-based violence, and political activism. Students will seek to understand women’s lives by connecting global data about the status of women to material consequences for individual women and local communities. Using gender as a theoretical category of analysis, the course will explore how gender inequality and oppression create disproportionate suffering and lack of opportunities for women and girls. Students will learn to ask critical questions about the complex and intersecting aspects of the oppression of women, as well as develop an understanding of the culturally situated, creative, and heroic ways women are standing up to gender oppression and shaping change within their local communities and nations. Credit may be awarded for either WGS 302 or SOC 345 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze key issues affecting women through a transnational feminist perspective, including immigration, education, maternal health, globalization, economics, war and conflict, gender-based violence, and political activism.
  • comprehend the value of locally-generated social change arising from and working within the culture of local communities.
  • demonstrate knowledge about the ways that women throughout the world are resisting gender oppression and organizing to reshape their own communities.
  • critically assess media representation to seek an understanding of historical and cultural complexities that are embedded in global women’s issues.
  • recognize key women activists who have received global recognition for their contributions.
  • apply knowledge as an emerging global citizen by considering options for contributing to positive change.

SOC 347 Women, Globalization, and Human Rights

  • Same As:WGS 304
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through global and transnational feminist perspectives, this course provides an overview of human rights ideas and frameworks, including the history and ongoing implementation of United Nations conventions, treaties, and campaigns concerning women. The course will consider the complex and gendered social, economic, and political impacts of globalization on women and girls around the world. Students will learn to critically engage with theories, approaches, and representation related to improving the lives of women in the global context and will learn about key human rights defenders who are recognized for their activism. Students will consider their own place in a globalized world and utilize course knowledge to think about their role in creating justice in the world. Credit may be awarded for either WGS 304 or SOC 347 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe human rights ideas and frameworks, including the history and implementation of United Nations conventions and treaties concerning women.
  • analyze the complex and gendered social, economic, and political aspects of globalization that disproportionately disadvantage and impact women in various locations around the world.
  • identify various feminist and social science theories and approaches to improving the lives of women globally, including human rights, global and transnational feminisms, gender in development, grassroots organizing, and global campaigns.
  • critically assess discourses related to women in the global context, including images and messages in the media, approaches and representations utilized by nongovernmental organizations, and language and methods within the United Nations human rights domain.
  • recognize key women’s human rights defenders who have made important contribution to furthering the rights of women and girls.
  • identify options, as a globally-oriented citizen, for involvement in positive social change.

SOC 350 Sociology of Popular Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course analyzes the historical development and emergence of American popular culture and the relationship between contemporary popular culture, social institutions, and collective behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the impact of differing popular culture products on different audiences through reception and consumption approaches.
  • define key terms relative to the study of popular culture.
  • examine the effects of subcultural and counter-cultural practice and objects on American society.
  • apply core concepts within the study of popular culture to historically relevant events and examples.
  • compare and contrast the main differences among core sociological theories such as conflict theory, structural functionalism, symbolic interactionism, and feminist theory and their application to popular culture.
  • analyze the historical, cultural, economic, and political influences on representations relating to race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and nationality.

SOC 375 Introduction to Community Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:CSU Area D0
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course draws from a sociological perspective to explore social problems, community building, and the basic principles and practices of community development and social change. Students will analyze successful models of community-based problem-solving interventions and practices.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of social problems and community development.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological and community development theory, research methods, and practice.
  • articulate and evaluate some of the most important community building strategies, their histories, and the controversies surrounding each.
  • articulate and assess local urban issues and communicate their own community building choices and commitments.

SOC 380 Introduction to Social Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 or ESLR 340 and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides a comprehensive overview of social services. Students will study the full range of organized activities of private, nonprofit, and public sector organizations that seek to prevent, alleviate, or contribute to the solutions of recognized social problems or to improve the well-being of individuals, groups, or communities. This is the introductory course for students interested in careers in applied sociology. This course provides a multicultural perspective and the opportunity to practice developing skills of critical analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critique concepts and issues pertinent to social services in the United States.
  • evaluate the history and organizational structure of social services.
  • assess public, private, and non-profit agencies as they operate in today’s society.
  • critique social services strategies at both micro and macro levels.
  • research and evaluate resources related to human services.

SOC 382 Introduction to Casework in Social Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Completion of ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 or ESLR 340 and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the socio-cultural context of the role of the case manager in contemporary American society. Explorations of the basic concepts of human behavior, exceptional and vulnerable populations, organizational structure and resource development, and case management principles are included in the curriculum.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate sociological methods of inquiry and theoretical perspectives, including interactionist, social exchange, eco-system, family systems, and comprehensive identity development theories.
  • apply methods of inquiry and theoretical perspectives to basic concepts of human behavior and their relevance to case management goals and principles.
  • evaluate cultural issues and how cultural subgroups function in American society.
  • analyze organizational structure and its application to resource development, roles and responsibilities of the case manager, inter-agency planning, networking , and risk evaluation.
  • appraise and discover methods of case management with client populations, including an introduction to diagnostic tools, varied communication strategies, types of planning, outcome evaluations, and termination strategies.

SOC 385 Practicum in Sociology

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course allows students to sociologically explore an internship work experience. Students will identify and secure an instructor-approved internship and will use the sociological perspective to analyze the organizational structures and processes of the workplace. Students will learn techniques to address common problems within social service and community-based organizations. Students will be required to fulfill 18 hours lecture (online or face-to-face formats) and 75 hours of instructor-approved paid work or 60 hours of volunteer work for one unit; the student will receive one additional unit for each segment of 75 paid hours or 60 volunteer hours of instructor-approved work.

This course may be taken four times for a maximum of 16 units as long as there are new or expanded learning opportunities on the job.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of the workplace.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological theory and research methods to work experiences in the social services and community-based organizations.
  • evaluate and recommend communication strategies for working in diverse organizations.
  • evaluate and assess how social stratification can impact experiences within community based and social service oriented workplaces and our ability to shape them.

SOC 480 Introductory Sociology - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines human behavior as it is affected by social forces. Concepts such as culture, social institutions, social stratification, social change, and social control will be analyzed from both a micro and macro-sociological perspective. This course is designed for students from all academic disciplines interested in an honors experience who are motivated to learn the sociological perspective and how it can be applied to all aspects of the human experience. The class is structured as a seminar in which students will be responsible for developing qualitative and/or quantitative analyses of controversial issues while drawing on classical and contemporary sociological theory to frame classroom activities. Students will utilize primary sources from sociological works and examine the texts and research via oral and written assignments, as well as with experiential activities and presentations. Credit may be earned for SOC 480 or SOC 300, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of social institutions and everyday life.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological theories and social research methods.
  • examine and develop an understanding of the social construction of reality and social categories.
  • evaluate the processes of social inequality, stratification, and agency through a social justice lens.

SOC 481 Social Problems - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 and SOC 300 with grades of "C" or better; ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 115
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines contemporary social problems at the global, national, regional, and local level from a sociological perspective. Students will explore the social causes and consequences of problems and interventions, analyze the role of power and ideology, and evaluate proposed solutions. This honors section uses an intensive seminar style of instructional methodology with extensive research projects on social problems designed to challenge motivated students. This course is not open to students who have completed SOC 301.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply the core principles of the sociological perspective to the study of social problems.
  • apply sociological theories and social research methods (including comparative/historical) to assess and analyze domestic and global problems as social processes.
  • assess how public policies and unequal social conditions affect individual and community experiences as well as how individual and community actions contribute to the continuation and/or change of those policies and conditions.

SOC 482 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 and SOC 300 with grades of "C" or better; ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 340 and ESLR 340, with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines patterns of ethnic relations. The course emphasis is domestic but includes investigations of global concerns. Topics include discrimination, prejudice, social stratification, inequality, racism, sexism, ageism, homophobia, and related subjects. This honors section uses an intensive seminar style of instructional methodology with extensive research projects on race and ethnicity designed to challenge motivated students. This course is not open to students who have completed SOC 321.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply and critique sociological research and theories of racism, privilege, and intersectionality as a means of maintaining domination and oppression.
  • evaluate how social processes have shaped the experiences of various underrepresented groups in the United States.
  • identify the historic and contemporary causes of prejudice and discrimination in the United States and assess the outcomes.
  • identify the social dynamics that lead to conflict, cooperation, and social change among groups in the US.

SOC 494 Topics in Sociology

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:SOC 300 and ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 101 or ESLR 340 and ESLW 340, with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides an examination of specific topics from a sociological perspective. The particular subject to be covered each semester will be determined by the Sociology Department and depend on topical events. Students may earn from .5-4 units. Consult the schedule of classes for specific topics. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by enrolling at the UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze contemporary social issues utilizing the sociological perspective.
  • demonstrate an understanding of and be able to critique the relationship between individual experience and social forces.
  • critically apply sociological concepts to everyday life.
  • evaluate the writings of sociologists, as well as those who write for the popular press.

SOC 495 Independent Studies in Sociology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves an individual student or small groups of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regular offered courses, pursuant to agreement among college, faculty members, and students. Independent studies in sociology offers students a chance to do research that is more typical of theoretical and applied sociology. Students may also choose to explore unique sociological topics under the direction of a sociology faculty member. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • choose and apply the sociological approach to work in independent studies.

SOC 499 Experimental Offering in Sociology

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020