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Ethnic Studies

Overview Degrees/Certificates Courses Faculty

Ethnic Studies (ETHNS) Courses

ETHNS 300 Introduction to Ethnic Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 300); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 300.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4; IGETC Area 7
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of the four core ethnic populations of Asian Americans, Chicano/Chicana/Latino/Latina/Mexican Americans, African Americans, and Native/Indigenous Americans within the United States. This course was formerly known as SOCSC 300, Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in any one or more of the following: Native American Studies, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, and Latina and Latino American Studies.
  • apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation.
  • critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities.
  • critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and/or Latina and Latino Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies.
  • describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American, African American, Asian American and/or Latina and Latino communities and a just and equitable society.

ETHNS 320 Introduction to African American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 320); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 320.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4; IGETC Area 7
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances of African Americans within the United States. This course is interdisciplinary in nature and presents an overview of the cultural, economic, historic, social, and political issues in the life of African Americans in the United States. It will expose students of all ethnic backgrounds to the issues germane to the experience of African Americans in the United States. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 320 The African American Experience.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and articulate concepts of Ethnic Studies, including but not limited to race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethnocentrism, euro-centrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • apply Identity, Conflict, Critical Race, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories to describe critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of African Americans, emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • describe how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by African American communities are relevant to current social and political issues.
  • demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom.

ETHNS 330 Introduction to Asian American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 325); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 325.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4; IGETC Area 7
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 330 The Asian American Experience in America.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and articulate concepts of Ethnic Studies, including but not limited to race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • apply Identity, Conflict, Critical Race, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories to describe critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of Asian Americans, emphasizing agency and group-affirmation. Explain the ideology of white supremacy as a means to understanding it (White Supremacy) as the organizing system of race relations in the U.S. Discuss the social, cultural and structural conditions that compelled the Asian American social movements (collective action) and organizations in the U.S.
  • critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • describe how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by communities of color are relevant to current issues. Use an interdisciplinary lens to explain the dimensions of progress for Asian Americans in the U.S. Develop concrete solutions to address the contemporary issues uniquely facing Asian Americans in the U.S.
  • demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom. List and describe contemporary social issues facing Asian Americans in the U.S.

ETHNS 340 Introduction to Chicana/o/x Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 330.); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 330.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4; IGETC Area 7
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course introduces students to the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Chicana/o/x Americans within the United States. Specifically, this course examines and redefines the lives of Chicana/o/x Americans through their own experiences from the inside looking out at the world. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 340 Chicanos/Mexican Americans in the U. S.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and articulate concepts of Ethnic Studies, including but not limited to race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethnocentrism, euro-centrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • apply Identity, Conflict, Critical Race, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories to describe critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of Chicana/o/x, emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • describe how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by Chicana/o/x communities are relevant to current social and political issues.
  • demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom.

ETHNS 341 The Sociology & Psychology of Mexicans and Latinos in the U.S.

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 332.); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 332.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

In this course, students will examine the cultural, sociological, and psychological experience of Mexicans and Latinos in the United States. This course will give students the opportunity to analyze the ways in which Mexican and Latino communities are shaped by family dynamics, socio-economic structures, and religious and educational institutions. Complex issues of identity, assimilation, and self-esteem will also be addressed. This course was formerly known as SOCSC 332.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain the origins of Mexican and Latino cultural values.
  • evaluate the socio-cultural differences between Mexicans and Latinos, and examine how the experience of these groups differs from other ethnic groups in the United States.
  • examine the psychological and cultural adjustments required of Mexicans and Latinos in the United States.
  • analyze the issues surrounding Mexican and Latino self-image.

ETHNS 350 Introduction to Native American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 335.); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 335.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4; IGETC Area 7
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Native Americans/American Indians within the United States. This course is a survey of traditional cultures of Native Americans/American Indians focusing on the social, religious, economic, and artistic practices. The antiquity, distribution, and linguistic histories of Native American/American Indian cultures are integrated with the contemporary status of Native peoples regarding social change and adaptation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and articulate concepts of Ethnic Studies, including but not limited to race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • apply Identity, Conflict, Critical Race (Tribal Critical Race), Liberation and Cultural Capital theories to describe critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of Native Americans/American Indians emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • describe how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by Native American/ American Indian communities are relevant to current issues.
  • demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom.
  • comprehend and compare the issues of sovereignty and nationhood relative to Native nations.
  • identify and evaluate forms of cultural retention, transmission, and adaptation.
  • evaluate the limited opportunities of Native American students to obtain an unbiased education.
  • identify and evaluate forms of cultural retention, transmission, and adaptation.

ETHNS 351 Native American Culture and the Impact of Federal Policy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Formerly approved for SOCSC 336.); UC (Formerly approved for SOCSC 336 .)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This course is an in-depth study comparing Native American traditional cultures and religions in response to the impact of the European invasion. This course includes a review of tribal origins and oral traditions; 'Manifest Destiny'; the impact of treaties; land in trust; and European/Spanish/French culture and religious influences on indigenous people of the Americas. The course also covers disease epidemics; colonization; missionization; religious resistance (The Ghost Dance); attempts at assimilation; the establishment of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; removal policies; reservation policies; boarding schools and the influence of Christianity on Indian children; the Dawes Allotment Act; citizenship; reorganization; termination, relocation and urbanization; social resistance; self determination (includes issues of religious freedom and the use of Peyote); the Indian Civil Rights Act; sacred sites; restoration; and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act; as well as cultural appropriation of indigenous religion. An optional field trip may be included. This course is formerly known as SOCSC 336.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify various Indian nations and describe their cultures and religions.
  • assess the impact of the European invasion on Indigenous cultures and religions.
  • evaluate the impact of ethnocentric ideas and behaviors and how they influence government policy.
  • explain the effect of disease on Indigenous peoples how it impacted religious beliefs.
  • evaluate the ways in which institutionalized racism was inherent in the structure of the federal government.
  • contribute to the development of empathy among all groups within a multi-ethnic society.
  • explain how culture, religion, society, and policy impact one another.

ETHNS 495 Independent Studies in Ethnic Studies

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 (College Writing) or ESLW 340 (Advanced Composition) with grades of "C" or better.
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

An independent studies project involves an individual student or a small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the regularly offered ethnic studies courses. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design and discuss a proposal of study with a supervising ethnic studies instructor.
  • demonstrate the ability to independently pursue a course of study or project in ethnic studies.
  • prepare a final report or project incorporating results of study or activities.

ETHNS 499 Experimental Offering in Ethnic Studies

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:January 1, 2024

This is the experimental courses description.