Allied Health

Allied Health (AH) Courses

AH 100 Professional Ethics of Health Team Members

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to professional and ethical behaviors of health team members. Students utilize a problem-solving process for analysis of common ethical dilemmas in health care. Emphasis is on integration of personal values, ethical principles, and legal regulations in ethical decision making.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the role and influence of morality, ethics, laws, and regulations on professional practice.
  • describe personal values that influence ethical decision making.
  • define the following principles related to professional ethics: nonmaleficence, beneficence, fidelity, autonomy, veracity, justice.
  • cite common examples of ethical and legal problems or dilemmas in the health professions.
  • list and apply the steps in the process of making sound ethical decisions.
  • recognize the importance of patients' rights, including confidentiality of patient information (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act).
  • recognize behavior that may result from stereotypes, biases, and prejudices.
  • discuss the purpose and enforcement of laws such as those under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Americans with Disabilities Act, and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
  • recognize the responsibility to act as a patient advocate with respect to addressing patient needs resulting from cultural and/or individual differences.
  • discuss common bioethical issues such as access to health care, end-of-life care, and physician assisted suicide.
  • compare and contrast characteristics, and legal and ethical responsibilities, of professionals and para-professionals in the field of health care.
  • recognize the ethical and legal responsibility to submit accurate documentation to substantiate billing.
  • describe the role of judicial, disciplinary, and ethics committees.
  • describe the health care provider's responsibility to protect the public and the profession by reporting unethical, incompetent, or illegal acts.
  • recognize the ethical and professional responsibility to regularly engage in self-assessment and personal goal setting.

AH 101 Introduction to Community Health Work

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to introduce students to the broad perspective of community health work by applying different concepts with emphasis on health promotion and primary health care. The course will examine different health promotion and disease prevention strategies that are used as primary health and population-based methods. Public health, home health care settings, and clinic/hospital-based services will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on family-wellness and illness in various community settings using examples of various communities and cultural settings throughout California. Aspects of community health are explored based on a demographic and epidemiological approach as well as building an environmental awareness and acquiring problem-solving and critical thinking skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the role and practice of a community health worker.
  • identify findings, patterns, habits, and behaviors that prevent the development and progression of common diseases/disorders and reduce utilization of unnecessary healthcare services.
  • explain the different health concerns across a person’s lifespan.
  • demonstrate how to conduct home visitations to monitor health needs and reinforce treatment regimens.
  • identify accepted terminology to describe findings, patterns, habits, and behaviors of clients.
  • identify self-care practices and self-improvement goals.

AH 102 Health Education of Patients and Family

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:LIBR 307 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the role of the health care professional as an educator of patients/clients and health care staff. Students will explore the major teaching and learning theories, and how they are applied to health care practice. This course covers characteristics of the learner including determinants of learning, adult literacy, compliance and motivation, cultural influences, and learning styles. Techniques and strategies for teaching and learning are presented.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the role of the health care provider as an educator.
  • explain the major teaching and learning theories and their application to health care.
  • recognize various sources of patient education materials and evaluate them for bias, language, and cost.
  • select appropriate sources of patient education materials for a variety of patient populations.
  • differentiate between goals and objectives and write effective behavioral objectives.
  • prepare a lesson plan for teaching a patient and/or the patient's family; implement the plan and critically evaluate whether or not the objectives were fulfilled.
  • prepare and deliver a lesson plan for teaching a group of patients who have similar problems.
  • evaluate other students' lesson plan presentations and provide feedback regarding the attainment of objectives and style of presentation.
  • accept feedback from instructors and other students regarding attainment of objectives and style of presentation to improve teaching style.

AH 103 U.S. Healthcare Systems and Third Party Payers

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and LTAT 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The United States healthcare system is complex, organized by systems and programs by which health services are made available to the population and financed by government entities, private enterprises, or both. Various systems work on different aspects of providing care throughout the spectrum of health. This course provides an overview of the United States healthcare system as it has developed during the past century. Students are expected to achieve a basic understanding of the building blocks in anticipation of future careers and employment in the healthcare industry of the United States.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the major components of the current and potential healthcare delivery systems in the United States.
  • describe the aspects of the “Triple Aim” of the U.S. healthcare system.
  • compare and contrast aspects of the U.S. healthcare system to those of other countries.
  • anticipate the interaction of healthcare providers and diverse patients and families with the various components of the U.S. healthcare system.
  • describe the theories and models of leadership and management most effective in the current and potential U.S. healthcare systems.
  • discuss the impact of selected cultures on the ability of healthcare providers and the U.S. healthcare system to meet the healthcare needs of patients, families and communities.
  • describe the communication styles of the primary U.S. healthcare providers, e.g., administrators, financial officers, managers, physicians, nurses, and patients from low, moderate and high socioeconomic status.
  • identify entry points into the various U.S. healthcare delivery systems.

AH 104 Aging and its Implications for Health Care

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces topics related to aging and their implication for health care providers. Emphasis is on socioeconomic and psychological aspects of aging, as well as normal age-related physiological changes. An overview of community resources that serve the older populations' health and dental needs is also included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the major socioeconomic characteristics of the older population, including ethnic, economic, education, family, religious, cultural, and residential factors.
  • discuss the influence of demographic and economic factors on health and dental care.
  • demonstrate understanding of basic mental health and cognitive function of the older adult.
  • describe key health promoting and disease prevention activities appropriate for older people.
  • identify age-related physiological changes.
  • interact with other health care professionals and community resources in order to provide coordinated care to older adults.

AH 105 Community Health Resources

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 300, LIBR 307, or LTAT 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to introduce students to the broad perspective of community health resources in the Greater Sacramento service area. Through various lectures from representatives of area organizations, students will gather community resources to assist clients with addressing their health needs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compile a database of community resources.
  • identify the available community resources in the Greater Sacramento service area, including health and social services.
  • apply accepted terminology to describe findings, patterns, habits, and behaviors of clients.
  • communicate with community partners and medical personnel.
  • demonstrate proficiency with technology, including web-based applications, MS Office, and electronic health record systems.

AH 106 Communication for Allied Health Careers

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to communication as a therapeutic intervention for health care team members. Aspects of verbal and nonverbal communication that affect interactions with patients, family members, and other health care providers are explored. Cultural differences and the need to adjust communication approaches with sensitivity to ethnicity, religion, gender, age, sexuality, disability, and health status are included. The course requires both personal reflection and class participation in role-play activities.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and demonstrate verbal and nonverbal communication skills intended to facilitate effective interactions with patients, families, health care providers, staff, and other team members.
  • conduct an effective helping interview.
  • demonstrate active listening skills that reveal understanding of content and feeling.
  • utilize communication techniques for resolving conflict and increasing rapport.
  • differentiate between non-assertive, assertive, and aggressive behaviors in interactions with others.
  • identify communication strategies for interactions that are confused or emotion laden.
  • discuss the impact of culture on the delivery of health care services.
  • adjust communication approaches with sensitivity to differences in ethnicity, culture, religion, socioeconomic status, gender, age, sexuality, disability, and health status.
  • describe the negative effects of labeling people with disabilities.
  • list and demonstrate principles of effective patient education for individuals and groups.
  • demonstrate openness and responsiveness to constructive feedback.
  • be able to communicate concepts of patient confidentiality and patient's rights including informed consent and right to refuse treatment.
  • evaluate their personal strengths and areas needing improvement with respect to communication style as a health care provider.

AH 108 Introduction to Health Occupations

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:LIBR 307 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides an introduction to the health care field and to the core foundational skills needed by all health care workers. Topics include types of health care delivery systems and careers, history and trends of health care, law and ethics pertaining to health care, personal qualities of health care workers, confidentiality and reportable incidents, and infection control and safety procedures for health care settings. Students will be introduced to research tools in the campus library and on the Internet. Students will use these tools to research health care careers and relate them to their own interests, values, and abilities. This course is open to all students wishing to explore the health care industry. A field trip to a local health care agency may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the importance of the history of medicine and evolution of the health care system.
  • differentiate between the various health care agencies and facilities, their delivery systems, organizational structure, and major services provided.
  • compare and contrast the roles and responsibilities, scope of practice, educational requirements, personal characteristics, and employment opportunities for different health care careers.
  • evaluate their interests, values, and abilities and use occupational resources to match these to potential health care careers.
  • demonstrate usage of reference materials in public and medical libraries (hard copy and Internet) to research health occupations.
  • identify and apply legal, ethical, and professional principles to common situations encountered in the health occupations.
  • identify the personal and professional characteristics, attitudes, and rules of appearance that apply to all health care professionals.
  • recognize the importance of cultural sensitivity and humility required of health care providers.
  • understand the basic principles and procedures for controlling the spread of infections and promoting safety in the health care setting.
  • accurately spell and pronounce common medical terms and abbreviations used in health occupations.

AH 110 Medical Language for Health-Care Providers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an orientation to medical language. Topics addressed include: basic structure of medical terms and their word-part components, term building and translation, spelling, pronunciation, and medical documentation formats. The course builds a medical vocabulary applicable to the specialties of medicine, the systems of the body, names of major diseases, and terms used in physical examination, diagnosis, and treatment.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of a fundamental medical vocabulary and related reference materials.
  • analyze, build, and translate medical terms.
  • spell and pronounce medical terms.
  • apply and interpret medical terms, abbreviations, and symbols as applied to systems of the human body, disease, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • identify medical documentation formats, related abbreviations, and legal considerations.
  • translate health care reports into common English usage.

AH 121 Social Determinants of Health

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and LTAT 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Social determinants of health are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age. These factors can all have an impact on health. This course will help students understand health inequalities and how they are socially driven. Students will look at how health is affected by wider determinants and how they can make a difference as health professionals to close the health inequality gap. Through a range of case studies from high to low income countries, the student will gain a better understanding of social determinants of health, why health inequalities exist, and the role of health professionals and systems in reducing health inequality.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the models of disease causation theories.
  • describe conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems that shape the conditions of daily life and health.
  • identify economic policies and systems, development agendas, social norms, social policies, and political systems that have an impact on social determinants of health.
  • describe key policies and programs in the United States aimed at improving health.
  • conduct community needs assessments using data collection methods.

AH 123 Prevention and Management of Chronic Conditions

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Acceptance into the Community Health Worker program.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and LTAT 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Chronic diseases are on the rise in the United States, leaving healthcare payers with the challenge of covering care for patients with these expensive, long-term conditions. In this course, students will learn about the most common chronic diseases, their etiology, symptoms, risk factors, and treatment. Students will learn about community preventive services, programs, and other interventions aimed at supporting patients in the successful self-management of chronic conditions. Students will also be introduced to medical terminology with an overview of the structure of medical language and basic terms.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define chronic conditions and factors that contribute to chronic conditions.
  • locate acceptable online resources for information on chronic conditions including causes, data, prevention and management.
  • explain the structure of medical language and introductory terms.
  • identify and describe the most common chronic conditions in the U.S. including the causes, symptoms, and treatments for each of them.
  • compare and contrast the medical and the public health treatment models of chronic conditions, and ways to integrate medical and public health models.
  • describe the concept of patient self-management of chronic conditions and the application of client-centered concepts and skills to patients.

AH 126 Sensation and Daily Life: Strategies for Success

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The world is filled with sensory experiences that can have both positive and negative effects on how we function. This applies to those who are in good health as well as to those who have some type of illness or impairment. With knowledge of one's sensory preferences and dislikes, individuals are able to better adapt to or modify situations and environments for improved performance in daily life. This course will enable students to identify their sensory profile and develop strategies they can use to optimize their performance in academic and life situations. In addition, this course will provide an overview of how others with illness or impairment may react to certain sensory experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how individuals react differently to sensory stimuli common in daily life situations.
  • describe how illness or impairment influences one's sensory reactions.
  • state his or her personal reactions to a range of sensory experiences common in daily life.
  • identify strategies for modifying or adapting to distracting stimuli and enhance or increase positive stimuli in academic and workplace settings.
  • distinguish between calming and alerting sensory reactions and how these influence performance in daily life tasks.
  • use calming and alerting reactions for positive outcomes in academic and workplace settings.
  • discuss how differences in sensory reactions might affect interpersonal communication in academic and workplace settings.

AH 290 Allied Health Skills and Applications

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in an allied health, dental assisting or hygiene, nursing, occupational therapy assistant, or physical therapist assistant course.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers individualized instructional modules designed to provide or improve skills in the various allied health courses. A partial list of skills may include the following: textbook comprehension, principles of learning and retention, note taking, annotating, discipline-based vocabulary, paraphrasing, reading graphics, test taking, spatial ability, proportionality, and problem solving. Registration is open through the fifth week of the semester. This course is graded Pass/No Pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the chapter outlining strategy to their own allied health text.
  • construct paraphrases for concepts presented in allied health textbooks or in their class notes.
  • prepare notes for their allied health class via a note-taking method such as the Cornell Method.
  • interpret various types of graphs and diagrams from their allied health textbook.
  • create concept maps in order to see relationships between ideas presented in their allied health textbook.
  • assess various test taking strategies appropriate for their allied health class.
  • demonstrate ability to read "actively" in their allied health textbook.

AH 295 Independent Studies in Allied Health

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regular offered courses, pursuant to an agreement among the college, faculty member, and student(s).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study.

AH 299 Experimental Offering in Allied Health

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


AH 300 Introduction to Project Management for Healthcare

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUS 107, CISA 305, CISA 315, CISA 323, and CISC 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (effective Summer 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an introductory course covering the following topics: fundamental project management terminology, skills, concepts and techniques, how the project management processes are linked together, and role of stakeholders and organizational influences on health care and other related projects.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and describe the responsibilities of a project manager in the healthcare industry.
  • compare and contrast theories of leadership and motivation.
  • examine and analyze case examples and justify solutions for healthcare systems.
  • define and apply project management processes and work products.
  • demonstrate using project control techniques during planning, and implement the techniques during the execution of a project.
  • identify and integrate into a project plan the ten knowledge areas of project management: integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communication, risk, procurement, and stakeholder management.
  • describe and incorporate the characteristics of a project life cycle and health system workflow process.
  • develop a class project using project management software.

AH 301 Health Care in a Multicultural Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area VI
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In all health professions and settings, culture is a factor that affects communication, compliance, and outcome. For best practice, cultural competency is a clinical skill that improves the relationship between patient and provider and is a skill desired by health care organizations. This course is designed to establish fundamental elements of cultural competency. Topics include cultural self-awareness and sensitivity, exploration of cultural beliefs about health and illness, health traditions and rituals, folk medicine, communication strategies, the use of language interpreters, and the influence of family roles.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze how cultural background and worldview may influence their role as a health care provider.
  • describe cultural awareness, sensitivity, and competency as related to health care service delivery.
  • summarize multiple cultural factors influencing an individual's perception of health and illness.
  • compare a variety of health traditions practiced within a specific culture.
  • select strategies for culturally competent health care service delivery.
  • state strategies to prevent the negative effects of cultural bias and discrimination as they relate to health care settings.
  • demonstrate the use of resources that support culturally sensitive health care delivery.

AH 312 Medical Terminology In Spanish

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This one-unit course for allied health students and practicing health care professionals will cover basic Spanish medical terminology and conversational skills normally used within a hospital or clinical setting. Videos, readings, everyday clinical situations, and activities such as role play and improvisation will be used to introduce the grammar structures, colloquial terms, and specialized medical vocabulary that health care professionals need to communicate effectively with the growing Spanish-speaking population. Cultural issues important to successful interactions with the Spanish-speaking patient will also be discussed. Knowledge of Spanish is not a prerequisite.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the Spanish pronunciation of the five vowels and apply to common words in Spanish.
  • demonstrate the ability to correctly pronounce el alfabeto.
  • describe the use of and demonstrate pronunciation of common verbs and pronouns in Spanish.
  • apply appropriate common expressions in Spanish during role play.
  • correctly state colors, numbers, hours, and days of the week.
  • correctly pronounce and label parts of the body in Spanish.
  • correctly pronounce common medical terms.
  • state phrases and questions commonly used in health care in Spanish.
  • investigate the cultural norms and practices of the Hispanic culture and how these guide thinking, decisions, and actions related to health care.

AH 495 Independent Studies in Allied Health

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves an individual student or small groups of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regular offered courses, pursuant to an agreement among college, faculty members, and students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce work independently on allied health related topics.

AH 499 Experimental Offering in Allied Health

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020