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Administration of Justice

Administration of Justice (ADMJ) Courses

ADMJ 300 Introduction to Administration of Justice

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course introduces the characteristics of the American criminal justice system, U.S. Constitutional Rights, criminal activity, crime causation, domestic and international criminal threats, law enforcement response to criminal activity, and future law enforcement trends. It emphasizes the components of the American justice system, due process, courts and correctional services, ethics, and leadership.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain the history, purpose, function, authority, and interactions of law enforcement, courts, and corrections on the local, state, and federal levels.
  • identify and differentiate career opportunities in the criminal justice system at the local, state, and federal levels.
  • examine due process and the protections provided by the U.S. Constitution.
  • analyze ethical decision making and leadership ability.
  • examine the methods, theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, and the costs of crime.
  • recognize criminological theories used to explain crime and criminality.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 301 Investigative Report Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course provides a study of the techniques of communicating facts, information, and ideas effectively in a simple, clear, and logical manner in the various types of reports used in the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on criminal justice terminology, organization of information, investigative note-taking and report writing, and presentation of written findings in a criminal court.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and compile data for use in report writing.
  • write a report communicating facts and ideas in a simple, clear, and logical manner.
  • identify and define vocabulary commonly used in the criminal justice system.
  • demonstrate how to document logical and organized notes during an interview or interrogation situation.

ADMJ 302 Community Relations: Multicultural Issues

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course examines the complex patterns of ethnic relations. The course emphasis relates specifically to the theoretical relationship between communities and the institutions of the justice system. The course examines the role and interplay of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, culture, and the justice system from a historical and contemporary perspective. This course analyzes the challenges and prospects of administering justice within a diverse, multicultural population in the United States and offers a comparative perspective of nonwestern societies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the term "community."
  • evaluate how social and political processes shaped the experiences of various underrepresented groups in the United States.
  • identify the historic and contemporary causes of prejudice and discrimination in the United States and assess the outcomes.
  • examine concepts of justice and fairness from the perspectives of victims, offenders, community members, and justice system professionals.
  • analyze the concepts of power, privilege, discrimination, and community justice with regard to the development and administration of the justice system.
  • examine how community perceptions of the justice system have been shaped historically by the relations between the system and different cultural groups within the community (e.g., social class, race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation, age, etc.).
  • examine the changing law enforcement agency, including ethnic and racial issues within the workforce and women in law enforcement.
  • recognize the impact of cultural diversity on law enforcement, multicultural law enforcement elements in terrorism and homeland security, and response strategies for crimes motivated by hate.
  • appraise how law enforcement professionals can resolve these social complexities with a greater need for consideration, sensitivity, and improved communication skills with members of various cultures including immigrant cultures from nonwestern societies.
  • analyze ethical decision making and leadership ability.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 303 Substance Abuse: Effects on Body and Behavior

  • Same As:PSYC 405
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course will educate students in drug identification, signs and symptomatology, methods of use, duration of effect, behaviors, addiction, and treatment options. The course examines historical and contemporary perspectives of substance abuse issues, epidemiologic data used to establish the prevalence, incidence, and identity of at risk groups, and trends of substances of abuse and approaches to treatment. This course is especially advised for people who are seeking or working in careers in health, law enforcement, counseling, psychology, business, social services, or teaching. Credit may be earned for either PSYC 405 or ADMJ 303, but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the anatomy, physiology, and basic chemistry of the nervous system.
  • explain the key elements of neural signaling, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, and drug effects on neural communication and on behavior.
  • demonstrate familiarity with historical and current substance abuse laws.
  • define and distinguish between drug addiction, dependence, misuse and abuse, and licit and illicit drugs.
  • describe potential risk factors for use and apply culturally appropriate solutions and/or interventions to various substance using/abusing populations.
  • examine the influence of culture and diversity on issues related to substance use and abuse as well as political, social, and economic factors involved in supply and demand; recognize, understand, and analyze how substance use and abuse issues are interwoven with economic, social, legal, and political institutions.
  • define and distinguish among the major categories of drugs in our society (e.g. stimulants, narcotics, hallucinogens) and identify any psychotherapeutic benefits.
  • describe current options for recovery/treatment from addiction/dependence and resources available at federal, state, and local levels.

ADMJ 304 Juvenile Delinquency

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 101, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (No comparable course) (effective Fall 2021)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is designed to examine at-risk and delinquent juvenile behaviors from a variety of historical and contemporary perspectives. This course examines the concept of delinquency, theories of childhood development, social, community, and environmental influences on children. An overview of adolescent problems and current approaches being utilized to confront these problems will also be discussed. Specifically, this course analyzes the nature and extent of delinquency with relation to gender differences, family dynamics, peer and gang groups, schools, drug use, and the juvenile justice courts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze theories of socialization that address the interrelationship of child, family, and community.
  • synthesize and analyze research regarding social issues, changes, and transitions that affect children, families, schools, and communities.
  • describe how gender differences, peer groups, family dynamics, schools, and drug use impact delinquency rates.
  • differentiate the many diverse views and perspectives that characterize the study of at-risk and delinquent behaviors.
  • assess the merits of the various theoretical models that have been used to explain the onset of delinquent behavior with a focus on choice, biology, psychology, and economic, cultural, and environmental influences affecting delinquency.
  • examine the concept of at-risk behaviors and status offending, the measurement of delinquency, and the trends and patterns in delinquency rates.
  • analyze the balance of theory, law, policy, and practice as they relate to juvenile delinquency.
  • examine various treatment approaches utilized to curb the onset of delinquency.
  • review public policy as it relates to the well-being of children and families.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 315 Pathway To Public Safety Careers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is designed for students who are pursuing careers in public safety services. Topics of this course include the history, structure, purpose, and function of federal, state, and local government services, as well as characteristics and function of careers that provide services for the well-being and safety to the public. This course examines the values and mission employed by public agencies, and also explores the complex relationship between communities and the institutions and agencies charged with their governance. Lastly, this course provides an overview of the complexity and thoroughness of the pre-employment testing processes involved in testing for jobs in public safety assignments. Emphasis is placed on career readiness, pre-employment preparation, writing competency, employment and career search techniques, application processes, pre-employment testing, interviews, background investigations, academy training, probationary status and conditional job offers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the history, structure, and function of federal, state, and local government public safety and judicial careers.
  • examine the contemporary purpose, structure, and function of federal, state, and local government public safety and judicial careers.
  • analyze how community perceptions of public safety agencies and systems have been shaped by the relations between the system and different cultural groups within the community (e.g., social class, race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation, age, etc.).
  • appraise how the public safety workforce is changing, including variables of race and ethnicity in recruiting, hiring, training, and promoting employees who have taken an oath to protect and serve the community.
  • apply ethical standards both personally and professionally.
  • comprehend the complexity and thoroughness of the pre-employment background investigation process, and identify potential career disqualifiers.
  • identify the written, physical, medical, psychological, and practical pre-employment testing associated with the various public safety pathways.
  • write reports in a clear and logical manner.
  • examine career pathway options in the field of public safety services.
  • Service requirements for criminal justice professionals, including cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion.

ADMJ 320 Concepts of Criminal Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course examines the philosophy and structure of criminal law in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the classification of crime, the general elements of crime, the definitions of common and statutory law, and the nature of acceptable evidence. This course utilizes case studies to introduce students to criminal law and the classification of crimes against persons, property, morals, and public welfare. It also includes a discussion of prosecution and defense decision making, criminal culpability, and defenses of crimes. ADMJ 480 is the "honors" equivalent of ADMJ 320. Students eligible for the Honors Program may elect to take ADMJ 480 instead of ADMJ 320. Because of the close similarity of the courses credit may be earned for ADMJ 320 or for ADMJ 480 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research the philosophical and historical evolution of criminal law.
  • examine the adversary system and sources of criminal law.
  • identify elements of offenses against the person, property, morals, and public welfare.
  • analyze a criminal court case and identify elements of the offenses and criminal defenses applicable to that case.
  • classify crimes according to severity.
  • interpret the capacity to commit crime, causation, and culpability.
  • examine the effects of ethical conduct of government officials and the relationship to the enforcement of criminal laws.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for court service professionals

ADMJ 321 Substantive Criminal Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ADMJ 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an in-depth study of the substantive criminal laws commonly enforced by California state, county, and municipal law enforcement officers. The course provides a complete analysis of both statute law as created by the state legislature and case law as defined in state and federal appellate court decisions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize the statutory definitions and case law interpretations of most of the major and minor offenses contained in California criminal law.
  • explain the objectives and legislative intent of the major criminal statutes found in the California Penal Code.
  • differentiate how the enforcement of law and public policy objectives are intertwined in California.

ADMJ 322 Criminal Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 122
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an in-depth study of criminal procedures used to enforce substantive law at both the federal and state level. Every step of the criminal process from arrest to appeal will be thoroughly explored in this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain each step of the criminal justice process from the point of arrest to the criminal trial.
  • analyze the roles played by prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys, and judges in the criminal justice process.
  • distinguish the differences between the authority, jurisdiction, and organization of state and federal courts.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 323 Legal Aspects of Evidence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 124
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course examines the origins, development, philosophy, and constitutional foundations of the rules of evidence as applied in United States law. Emphasis is placed on the types of evidence and laws governing admissibility of evidence into criminal procedures. Topics covered include search and seizure, hearsay evidence, witness competency, and direct evidence as contrasted to circumstantial evidence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish the difference between direct and circumstantial evidence and examine the impact that each has on a criminal procedure.
  • identify situations where a search warrant is required as opposed to those occasions where an exception to the search warrant rule will suffice.
  • analyze the various types of evidence.
  • describe the laws governing the admissibility of evidence into criminal procedure.
  • analyze the laws of search and seizure.
  • evaluate and apply the rules of evidence to specific case facts.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 330 Criminal Investigation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course introduces students to investigative procedures and concepts applied to criminal investigations. Topics include crime scene response, collection and processing of physical evidence, techniques of surveillance, undercover assignments, and interrogation. This course will examine the role of the criminal investigator, legal requirements, search warrants, warrant service, and recognizing exceptions to the search warrant rule.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe critical ethical issues relating to criminal investigations.
  • identify the sequential conceptual states in criminal investigation and identify associated activities for each stage.
  • identify appropriate actions for first responders at crime scenes.
  • identify the functions for crime scene investigation and specify the tasks performed in each function.
  • analyze interview and interrogation techniques for witnesses and suspects of criminal offenses.
  • examine the procedures involved in warrant requests and warrant service.
  • define the investigator's role during the trial process and understand the rules of criminal procedure to include the requirement of proving the elements, categories, and features of crimes in order to initiate prosecutions.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements of a criminal investigator.

ADMJ 331 Patrol Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course will study the organization of patrol division, types of patrol, and patrol duties. The role of the patrol officer in community relations, crime prevention, ethics, professionalism, and law enforcement will be examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the organization of the patrol division in a law enforcement agency.
  • explain the rules governing a patrol officer's conduct.
  • differentiate the techniques and methods used by the police to cope with specifics that will be encountered while on patrol.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 332 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

  • Same As:ANTH 303
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ANTH 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area IV
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an overview of forensic anthropology, an applied field of physical anthropology. Forensic anthropology uses the analysis of human skeletal remains to answer medico-legal questions. This course emphasizes current techniques used in analysis of human skeletal remains, medico-legal procedures, and the role of the anthropologist in the investigative process. It examines the basics of bone biology, methods of skeletal analysis, and recognition of bone pathology and trauma. Students may earn credit for either ANTH 303 or ADMJ 332 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the methods and approaches of a forensic anthropologist.
  • apply the techniques for determining sex, age, and ethnicity from human skeletal remains.
  • examine a human skeleton and infer possible trauma and pathology.
  • discuss the legal and ethical issues of working with human remains.
  • apply the processes for establishing positive identification using human remains.
  • explain the role of the forensic anthropologist in a criminal investigation.
  • describe the dynamics of dental anthropology in positive identification.
  • evaluate the significance of human skeletal remains to overall crime scene investigation.

ADMJ 335 Profiling Terrorism

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course examines the world wide phenomenon known as terrorism. Students will study the social-historical origins of terrorism and the ideologies and philosophies of terrorist groups on a national and international level. Emphasis will be on exploring the law enforcement/intelligence methods utilized to prevent and respond to terrorist-related crime.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the different definitions of terrorism.
  • desribe the criminal elements that are necessary to classify a terrorist act as a crime.
  • evaluate domestic and international terrorism and develop a basic understanding of the origins and background of both domestic and international terrorism.
  • identify law enforcement and intelligence methods to prevent and respond to terrorist incidents.
  • describe the modus operandi of various terrorist groups and the law enforcement methods used to investigate terrorist groups.
  • assess and propose appropriate interventions to terrorism for current and historical terrorist activities.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 340 Introduction to Correctional Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b) (effective Summer 2021)
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course provides an overview of both the adult and juvenile corrections systems in the United States. The topics in this course include the history of the correctional system in America, the school to prison pipeline that exists with at-risk groups, a focus on the legal issues, specific laws, and general operation of correctional institutions, and an introduction to probation and parole supervision. The relationship between corrections and other components of the criminal justice system is also examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the history of corrections and predict future trends within corrections including the schools to prison pipeline that exists with high risk groups
  • ­describe the legal issues, specific laws, and general issues encountered in a corrections facility
  • explain the relationship between corrections, law enforcement, and the court systems
  • distinguish the difference in adult and juvenile corrections, probation, and parole
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals

ADMJ 346 Probation and Parole

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course will compare and contrast probation and parole. Topics will include organization, function, goals, ethics, historical development, and treatment theory. California probation and parole programs will also be examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply written skills toward probation and parole reports, and court documentation.
  • examine the evolution of the community corrections model.
  • describe the role of probation officer in corrections.
  • describe the role of parole agent in corrections.
  • identify the skills and techniques that are commonly utilized by probation and parole employees.
  • compare and contrast supervision styles as applied in the public sector with those utilized in probation and parole.
  • evaluate methods of intervention with case study examples.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 349 Introduction to Crime, Deviance, and Social Control

  • Same As:SOC 318
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 and either ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Same As SOC 318)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course introduces various sociological perspectives regarding issues of crime, deviance, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of how laws and cultural norms shape the definition and meaning of crime and deviance. Topics covered include street crimes, corporate crimes, white-collar crimes, domestic violence, drugs and alcohol abuse, lifestyle crimes, prison systems, capital punishment, rehabilitation, and the trend towards privatization of prisons. Field trips may be required. Credit may be earned for ADMJ 349 or SOC 318 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply core sociological perspectives to crime, deviance, and social control.
  • assess, analyze, and apply sociological and criminological theories of crime and deviance.
  • understand the social construction of crime, deviance, and social categories of offenses.
  • evaluate and assess how social stratification can impact experiences within the criminal justice system and our ability to shape them.

ADMJ 480 Concepts of Criminal Law - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

Honors courses are open to students who demonstrate an ability to write carefully reasoned, well-organized essays of varying lengths, are prepared to make clear oral presentations in class, and are able to actively contribute to seminar discussions. This course examines the philosophy and structure of criminal law in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the classification of crime, the general elements of crime, the definitions of civil law, common and statutory law, and the nature of acceptable evidence. This honors section uses an intensive instructional methodology with extensive research projects to challenge motivated students. Particular emphasis is placed on the utilization and analysis of case studies related to criminal law and the classification of crimes against persons, property, morals, and public welfare. It also includes a discussion of prosecution and defense decision making, criminal culpability, and defenses of crimes. Credit may be earned for ADMJ 320 or ADMJ 480 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research the philosophical and historical evolution of criminal law.
  • appraise the adversary system and sources of criminal law.
  • identify elements of offenses against the person, property, morals, and public welfare.
  • analyze a criminal court case and identify elements of the offenses and criminal defenses applicable to that case.
  • classify crimes according to severity.
  • interpret the capacity to commit crime, causation, and culpability.
  • examine the effects of ethical conduct of government officials and the relationship to the enforcement of criminal laws.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.
  • engage in scholarly and academic dialogue amidst peers at venues such as Honors Research Conferences to foster learning communities and exhibit commitment for intellectual exchanges.

ADMJ 494 Topics in Administration of Justice

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is designed to examine current problems or specific topics pertaining to the administration of justice field. Particular subjects to be covered each semester will be determined by faculty from within the administration of justice department.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze contemporary issues in the field of administration of justice.
  • integrate new data into a better understanding of current administration of justice issues.
  • examine current interest topics in administration of justice.
  • develop skills and knowledge in the area of the title of the segment being offered.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 495 Independent Studies in Administration of Justice

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is designed to examine current problems or specific topics pertaining to the administration of justice field. Particular subjects to be covered each semester will be determined by faculty from within the administration of justice department.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify an area of interest and design a plan of activities to gain knowledge or skills in that area.
  • independently follow a proposed plan of study from the design stage to completion.
  • evaluate and reflect on personal skills, abilities, and knowledge.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 498 Work Experience in Administration of Justice

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:According to Title 5 regulations, a student cannot earn academic credits in a Work Experience class unless they have either a job or an internship that relates specifically to the field of Administration of Justice.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is designed to provide students with effective job development skills that will assist them in obtaining and keeping an internship or a job in the student's major area. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; the responsibilities of an internship (where applicable) or a job; completion of Title 5 Education Code papers (the student's Application, Learning Objectives, Timesheet, and Evaluations), which document the student's progress and hours spent at the workplace or internship site; and developing workplace (soft) skills relevant to the 21st-century workplace. In addition, the student is required to fulfill 18 hours lecture and 75 hours of related, paid work experience or 60 hours of volunteer work experience for one unit; 75 or 60 hours of related work experience for each additional unit. The program allows the student to combine practical, paid or non-paid work experience with college training. The course may be taken up to four times when there is new or expanded learning on the job for up to 16 units. In addition, the student and the Work Experience instructor may tailor the course to meet the student's specific professional needs by identifying 1-4 workshops, trainings, or conferences that the student may attend as part of the curriculum of the ADMJ 498 class. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply classroom study through application of planned, supervised on-the-job experience.
  • develop practical workplace (soft) skills, acquire knowledge, and build confidence in the workplace.
  • evaluate themselves in the following career and life planning process: self-awareness; career awareness; decision making and goal setting; job search and workplace success; balanced lifestyle.
  • recognize the significant importance of cultural competency, integrity, transparency, ethical decision making, accountability, and compassion as part of the service requirements for criminal justice professionals.

ADMJ 499 Experimental Offering in Administration of Justice

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021


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